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Cyclingnews.com

Latest Race Results from Cyclingnews.com
  1. Elia Viviani (Deceuninck-QuickStep) claimed his first victory since March on stage 4 of the Tour de Suisse, beating Michael Matthews (Team Sunweb) and Peter Sagan (Bora-Hansgrohe) in a bunch sprint in Arlesheim.

    All the major sprinters survived the late third-category climb to contest the sprint, though Tour de France champion Geraint Thomas (Team Ineos) crashed out of the race with 30km to go and was taken to hospital.

    After a messy run down into Arlesheim, in which Matej Mohoric (Bahrain-Merida) and Mathias Frank (AG2R La Mondiale) launched speculative attacks, Viviani’s team took control in the final two kilometres and executed a near-perfect lead out.

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    Kasper Asgreen led them to the flamme rouge, making way for Yves Lampaert, before Viviani’s trusted lead-out man Michael Morkov took him to 200 metres. Viviani and Sagan opened their sprints at the same time, but the Italian champion pulled away in the final 50 metres, turning the tables after finishing second to the Slovakian on the previous day’s uphill finish.

    Despite initially matching Viviani, Sagan faded and launched a slightly desperate long-range bike throw but was pipped for second place by Matthews, who came up fast on the right-hand side. Matteo Trentin (Mitchelton-Scott) finished a more distant fourth, his legs sapped by having to charge up the side of the pack in the wind before the others had thought about sprinting.

    "Yesterday we planned it really well but on a finish like that Sagan is hard to beat. Today, we knew the hard point would be the climb, not the sprint, so when I got over the climb I had tired legs but thought if I see 200m to go I’ll just do the best sprint I can. The guys did an amazing job, it was a perfect lead-out and I’m pretty proud of my team," Viviani said.

    How it unfolded

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

  2. Peter Sagan (Bora-Hansgrohe) claimed his 17th career victory at the Tour de Suisse with a dominant sprint on the cobbled uphill finish in Murten on stage 3 on Monday, taking the overall lead in the process.

    The three-time world champion kicked hard with just over 100 metres to go on the cobbled incline and comfortably got the better of Elia Viviani (Deceuninck-QuickStep) and John Degenkolb (Trek-Segafredo).

    Having started the day second overall, tied on time with leader Kasper Asgreen (Deceuninck-QuickStep), Sagan moves into the yellow jersey thanks to the 10 bonus seconds he collected for the stage win.

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    After finishing second on stage 2, leading home the bunch behind solo winner Luis Leon Sanchez (Astana), Sagan seemed determined to add to his impressive tally at the Swiss WorldTour race. While it was Viviani's and Degenkolb's teams who control of the peloton in the closing kilometres, it was he who asserted himself most forcefully and effectively. First of all he fought for the wheel of Viviani, who had Max Richeze and Michael Morkov leading in front of him in the last 2km, then he bullied Degenkolb off the wheel of his lead-out man Jasper Stuyven, who'd hit the front in the final kilometre.

    With positioning vital ahead of the left-hand corner that led into the final incline with 200 metres to go, that was the key moment. Sagan went through the bend and onto the cobbles in second wheel and, with a small gap having opened between he and Degenkolb, wasted no time in opening the taps. Using a smooth strip of road that ran through the cobbles, he surged clear, the incline suiting him perfectly, and won convincingly.

    "I'm happy with this stage win, my 17th at the Tour de Suisse, and the leader's yellow jersey," Sagan said. "I'd like to thank the whole team for their brilliant work, they controlled the race and placed me in a perfect spot for the victory. It was a very fast finale and quite hectic because everybody wanted to be in the front. When we crossed the finish line for the first time, it was clear to me that in order to have a chance at winning, I had to be in the first positions of the group before the last left turn. That's what we did and I was able to attack in the final stretch to get the victory."

    How it unfolded

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

  3. Jesus Herrada (Cofidis) won the inaugural edition of the Mont Ventoux Denivele Challenges on Monday, beating Romain Bardet (AG2R La Mondiale) to the top of the so-called 'Giant of Provence'.

    The Spaniard, who won the Tour of Luxembourg earlier this month, was the only rider able to follow when Bardet attacked 8.6km from the summit of the 21.3km final climb, his team having shredded the 80-rider peloton.

    The duo climbed the rest of the exposed mountain together, with Herrada looking utterly at ease as he comfortably responded to a series of accelerations from Bardet in the final 3km. With 400 metres to go, he launched a big attack of his own and surged clear, beating his chest as he crossed the line.

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    Bardet, who had finished 10th overall at the Criterium du Dauphine barely 24 hours previously, crossed the line nine seconds down, with Rein Taaramae (Total Direct Energie) taking the final spot on the podium more than a minute back.

    The organisers of Mont Ventoux Denivele Challenges had run Gran Fondos in recent years but put on a 1.1 UCI-classified race for the professionals this year, offering a one-day event for pure climbers. The route packed 4,100 metres of elevation gain into the 173km route, with six more minor climbs leading towards the mighty Mont Ventoux, one of the most famous climbs of the Tour de France.

    A five-rider breakaway went clear early on, containing Brice Feillu (Arkea-Samsic), Alex Aranburu (Caja Rural), Remy Rochas (Delko Marseille Provence), Angelo Tulik (Total Direct Energie), Mario Gonzalez (Euskadi-Murias). It was clear it was all going to come down to the final ascent, with the peloton almost at full capacity as they kept the break on a relatively short leash over the Col de Toulourenc, Col des Aires, Col de l’Homme Mort, Côte de Gordes at 116km, Col des Trois Termes, and Côte de Blauvac.

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

  4. Luis León Sánchez (Astana) won stage 2 of the Tour de Suisse with a solo attack 11 kilometres from the line. The Spaniard, who finished six seconds up on the charging peloton, rounded off a great day for Astana, who also sealed victory at Critérium du Dauphiné moments earlier.

    Peter Sagan (Bora-Hasngrohe) led the peloton home to take second place, while Matteo Trentin (Mitchelton-Scott) took third. Kasper Asgreen (Deceuninck-QuickStep) took fourth but moves into the race lead thanks to bonus seconds acquired earlier in the stage.

    Astana took charge of the race over the final two climbs of the day, blowing the peloton apart and dropping the sprinters on the steep slopes of the final ascent of Chuderhüsi. Omar Fraile made a move on the climbs, but it was Sanchez who took advantage of a lull in the peloton on the flat roads heading to the finish.

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    With several sprinters making their way back to the front, Sanchez launched, and quickly built a gap as the likes of CCC Team and Team Sunweb struggled to organise a chase. Once the chase was co-ordinated, it was already too late, and Sanchez had time to slow up and celebrate before crossing the line.

    "I am so happy I could win today," Sanchez said. "I did not expect I could be so strong in the final, but I was lucky to hold the gap until the end. We knew we have to do this race as hard as possible as there are many big sprinters in the peloton. We had to try to escape the bunch sprint to get a chance to fight for the victory."

    How it unfolded

    Three laps of a circuit around Langdau im Emmental played host to the second stage of the race, each featuring two second-category climbs – Schallenberg (8km at 5.1 per cent) and Chuderhüsi (3km at 9.2 per cent). With the stage favouring classics riders, a bunch sprint was expected at the finish.

    You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

Sagan
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